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Useful APIs

Free APIs That We Can Use to Get Informed

In the software development world, practice makes perfect. Therefore, we should find as many ways to practice programming as possible.

With free public APIs, we can practice programming by creating apps that use those APIs.

In this article, we’ll look at some practice project ideas that can use some of those APIs.

Statistics Analysis App

The Time Door API is an API that lets us send data to its API and then it can do some basic statistical analysis for us.

Once we pass in some time-series data to it, it’ll return mean change strength, variance change strength.

Also, it detects anomalies, recurring patterns, how patterns change over time, check for critical transition points, and a lot more.

The Unplugg API is another API where we can send in our time series data and then it makes some forecasts about those values in the future.

It’s very simple and doesn’t have as much functionality as the Time Door API, so if we’re overwhelmed with the Time Door API, we can use this one instead.

They both require an API key for authentication, then we can use it as we please.

News App

There’re plenty of news organizations that provide their data via an API.

The Associated Press press provides its media and news metadata via its API.

Also, we can use it to get their election data. We just need an API key to get started.

Another API is the Feedbin API. It’s used to aggregate RSS feeds into one place.

We can manage all our RSS subscriptions with this API. Also, we can get more detailed user information like recently read entries, updated entries, pages, and more.

It requires OAuth for authentication so it’s great to learn how to add authentication with this.

The New York Times newspaper also has a useful API with news headlines and featured images provided for free.

It’s also free and provides us with lots of data about the news, books, media, and more.

For news articles, they only provide the headline, images, and metadata and not the content.

If we want the content, we can pay for the News API. It aggregates data from news sources from all over the world.

It also has a free tier with news headlines, features images, and metadata from new sources from all over the world.

However, we can pay to get access to the content as well. There aren’t that many API that let us access full content even for pay.

All we have to do is to sign up for an API key and then we can get started.

The Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom also has an API. We can access news content for free and we can get more if we pay.

Even if we don’t pay, we still get lots of content for free, which includes the text content of the news article.

If we pay for the API, then we get all the content instead of just the text.

Internet Time Machine App

Archive.org’s API always provides us with archives of old versions of lots of websites for free.

And with the API, we can build our own app to display the content our way.

Not only can we use it to get snapshots of old websites, but we can also use it to create new snapshots.

Also, we can use it to get book data like book covers, availability, and get information about book donations.

We can use it without authentication so that we can use it right away.

An App to Summarize the Content of the URL

The LinkPreview API is an API that provides a summary of the content that’s loaded by a given URL in JSON format.

It provides us with metadata of a page like a title, description, featured image, and URL.

To use it, we have to sign up for an API key.

Conclusion

News data is available everywhere. We can use APIs like The Guardian and News API to get full news data and create an app that uses that data to make our own news app.

Also, we can do statistical analysis with APIs easily with some time series analysis and forecast APIs.

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Useful APIs

Free APIs That We Can Use to Make Entertaining and Useful Apps

In the software development world, practice makes perfect. Therefore, we should find as many ways to practice programming as possible.

With free public APIs, we can practice programming by creating apps that use those APIs.

In this article, we’ll look at some practice project ideas that can use some of those APIs.

Joke App

With the Chuck Norris Database API, we can make our own apps to display jokes about Chuck Norris.

We can display them however we like. We can display them randomly, get jokes by category, and whatever another way we can think of.

No authentication is required, so we can dig in without signing up.

Trivia Game

The Open Trivia API has a list of questions that are provided via their API. Each quest has both correct and incorrect answers.

Therefore, we can use it to make a trivia game app with ease. We can just display the questions and the choices and we can check against the answers that are listed.

No authentication is required, so we can dig in without signing up.

Donald Trump Quotes App

The Tronald Dump API provides us with what Donald Trump has said since he’s become a famous person.

There’re many ways to use them and display the quotes in entertaining ways.

No authentication is required, so we can dig in without signing up.

Comic App

With the xkcd API, we can get all the comics from xkcd without any effort.

We just have to make a request for each comic by ID and then we can display the comic provided as an image URL and the metadata in our own app.

No authentication is required, so we can dig in without signing up.

Bing Maps App

Bing Maps is a great resource for map data. We can use it to display maps, get geographies data, street view, routing information, location data, and much more.

It’s often overlooked since Google is the dominating maps provider, but Bing also provides tons of data for free or a low price.

To use the data, we have to sign up for an API key to gain access to it.

Google Maps App

Google Maps is the maps API that everyone thinks of when they look for a map API.

It also has free and paid tiers with much of the same information as provided by the Bing Maps API.

All we have to do is to sign up for an API key. However, do note that a credit card is required to sign up even for the free tier.

Coronavirus Tracker

The COVID-19 API has the latest data from John’s Hopkins University about the cases of the COVID-19 disease that’s been spreading for the last few months all over the world.

It has recorded data from the past and also the latest infection case data.

If we want to know when we can get out of the house again, then build an app with this and check the trends ourselves.

No authentication is required, so we can just start using it.

US Health Insurance App

The Healthcare.gov API has data about the American insurance marketplace that we can get in no time.

It’s all available as JSON so we can display them the way we like. It has education content like explaining what the insurance marketplace, so we can learn more from them.

Job Search App

Various job websites have provided their data via their API in addition to their regular website.

They include Github Jobs, GraphQL Jobs, Indeed, ZipRecruiter and more for jobs from any category, including the public and private sectors.

There’s plenty of data like description, name, location, and more. Also, we can search for them by keyword or location, which is very handy.

To gain access to them, we just have to sign up for an API key and then we can start playing with these APIs.

To make an app that lets us display and search for public sector jobs data, we can use the Search.gov Jobs API.

It has a full list of endpoints that we can call to gain access to federal jobs data, including searching by location, hiring paths, who qualify for which job, and more.

Conclusion

We can build lots of apps with free public APIs. They include job search apps, maps apps, and health info apps.

If we want some entertainment, we can also build apps that display and make a trivia game out of some trivial APIs.

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Useful APIs

Useful Practice Apps We Can Build With Free APIs

In the software development world, practice makes perfect. Therefore, we should find as many ways to practice programming as possible.

With free public APIs, we can practice programming by creating apps that use those APIs. After writing the practice apps, we can even pay for some APIs and write even more useful apps.

In this article, we’ll look at some practice project ideas that can use some of those APIs.

Phone Number Validator

We can use the numverify API to verify phone numbers to make sure that they’re valid.

Now we won’t have to worry about calling phone numbers that might not be used by anyone.

It works with phone numbers from 232 countries and can give us the phone company and location that the phone number is located in.

Git App

The big Git hosts all provide their own APIs to let us automate tasks that are needed to be done with them like pulling and pushing code, merging code, etc.

There’s Bitbucket, GitHub, and Gitlab, which all let us do many Git operations with them.

They’re all very secure as authentication is done using OAuth and authorization is the same as using the UI to manipulate the Git repositories.

Website / RSS Aggregator

With the import.io API, we can aggregate data from various websites and RSS feeds and get them all from one source.

It supports CORS so we can access data right from our front end apps. An API key is required to use this API.

The data that’s aggregated with import.io is returned in JSON so that we can use the data right away.

We can use it to crawl websites and RSS feeds and extract data as we wish. Jobs can be run on the fly and also run on a scheduled basis by setting a schedule with the API.

An App to Find Technologies Use On Other Websites

Ever curious about what technologies on websites that we visit? We can use the Let’s Validate API to create an app that reveals the technologies that are used on websites of our choice.

It doesn’t require any authentication so that we can use them right away.

API Testing App

We can use the Postman API to make our own requests to APIs with ease. It lets us write programs to script the testing of APIs by using the Postman API.

The Postman API can be used to send query strings, headers, and get response bodies and headers.

Dictionary App

With various APIs, we can create our own dictionary app with various dictionary APIs.

There’s the Merriam-Webster API, Oxford dictionary API, Wordnik API, and the Words API.

They’re all available for free as long we limit our queries and sign up for an API key to use them.

They provide definitions of words, pronunciations, word types, and more data.

In the case of the Words API, it also provides synonyms for words. The Oxford dictionary API also has a thesaurus, translations for words, sentences API to get us example sentences for a given word, and more.

If we pay, then we get access to more things like more API requests a day

File Conversion App

The Cloudmersive Document and Data Conversion app lets us write the programs to use the API to convert data between various formats.

They include converting between common formats like HTML, Office files, or photo files to PDF.

We can also use it to merge multiple Office documents into one.

Other data formats that the API can convert include CSV to JSON and XML to JSON.

Cloudmersive also makes other APIs like email validation APIs, natural language processing APIs, OCR APIs, barcode scanning APIs and more.

It can take images and then parse them into readable text with the OCR API. The barcode scanner API takes images of the barcode and returns the data from the barcode.

Conclusion

There’re lots of APIs that we can use to do various things like converting files, barcode scanning, OCR, and more.

We can also use APIs to automate Git operations like pushing, fetching, and pulling code from to and from repos.

Finally, we can validate data like phone numbers with various APIs.

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Useful APIs

Free APIs We Can Use to Build Productivity and Recreational Apps

In the software development world, practice makes perfect. Therefore, we should find as many ways to practice programming as possible. With free public APIs, we can practice programming by creating apps that use those APIs.

In this article, we’ll look at some practice project ideas that can use some of those APIs.

HTML to PDF Converter

We can use the pdflayer API to convert HTML documents from files and URLs to PDFs.

All we need is an API key and then we can use it convert HTML to PDFs with little effort.

Document Bookmarker

The Pocket API lets us use their bookmarking service to add, change, and remove bookmarks via their API.

It let us automate the process and view articles that are bookmarked via the API.

With the Article View API, the whole document’s content is returned and we can use it to display the data.

To-Do Lists

We can use some todo list APIs like Todoist and Wunderlist to create our own programs to create todo lists that save that on those service providers via their APIs.

The Todoist API can do a lot like creating projects, templates, items, labels, notes, project notes, file uploads, etc.

Also, we can create set reminders and due dates for todo tasks.

These are things that’ll take a lot of effort on our end to do. With this API, we can do that with half the effort since we eliminated the need to build an API to do all that.

The Wunderlist API has similar capabilities. We can do the same things with it, put add memberships for accessing todo lists.

And we can create webhooks to create todo lists.

Event Information App

There’s APIs for big event websites like Eventbrite, Picatic, Ticketmaster which can be used to retrieve events.

The Eventbrite API gives us access to their API via OAuth. It gives us data on event capacity, description, schedule, teams, and more.

We can also get data on organizations’ data including their members and their roles.

Furthermore, we can get the seat map for various venues with it.

The Ticketmaster API provides similar data as the Eventbrite API so that we can get the same kind of data with it. The difference is that we use an API key for authentication instead of OAuth.

Food and Drink Apps

We can get data from various food and drink APIs like the LCBO API to get alcohol data from the government liquor store in Ontario, Canada.

It has data on images, winery information, retail locations of the liquor store chain, inventory of liquor in different locations and more.

If we want to create a food app, we can create an app using the Recipe Puppy API.

The API only has one endpoint. We can search for recipes store in the database behind the API with the keywords we enter in.

It supports pagination so that it won’t overwhelm their API servers.

Restaurant App

A restaurant app is a useful app for discovering restaurants. Frameworks like the Zomato API lets us get information like restaurant name and location, reviews, menus, etc.

All we need is an API key to access their data.

We can also get restaurant data organized by various things like categories, cities, collections, cuisines, and geolocation coordinates.

It can also be used to find the daily menu, restaurant info, and reviews for a given restaurant.

Beer App

With the PunkAPI, we can create our own app to look up beer information.

No authentication is required for this API, but there’s a rate limit for a given IP address.

It returns data like beer name, the yeast beer is made from, the year range that the beer is brewed, and the hops and malt content.

It can also return a random beer.

Conclusion

We can do a lot with free APIs. There are APIs to convert HTML to PDF, so we can make our own document format converter app.

Also, we can get data about restaurants, food, recipes, drinks, and more if we’re interested in food. Therefore, we can use them to make our own apps to search and display the data our way.

Finally, we can make our own apps to display event and venue data so that we can display the data the way we want to.

Categories
Useful APIs

Fake REST APIs That We Can Use to Build Prototypes

When we want to build prototypes, we want to build them fast. Therefore, we should find a fake REST API so that we don’t need to write our own for a quick prototype.

In this article, we’ll look at some fake REST APIs that we can use to mock out our back end for prototypes.

JSONPlaceholder

JSONPlaceholder is a useful REST API that lets us do CRUD operators on their server by sending requests to their REST API.

It supports CORS so that we can use them with our front end apps.

The endpoints follow the REST API convention so it’s also great examples for us to follow.

There’re a few endpoints like comments, photos, albums, todos, and posts that we can query and send.

Reqres

Reqres is a useful REST API to let us mock out our API for our front end.

It explicitly says that it supports Ajax requests so we can go ahead and use it with our front end directly.

There’re lots of routes that are available. They include GET, POST, PATCH, and DELETE routes.

Most of the routes are user-related routes, so we can fake an authentication system without building one ourselves.

typicode/json-server

The JSON server program is a Node package that we can run on our local computer.

We can define our routes by providing them with fake JSON data.

Therefore, we can create any route we like, unlike the previous examples.

It’s very configurable and can be adapted to be used in any situation. It supports things like charging ports, HTTPS, custom routes, middleware, and more.

We can also serve static files with it. So it’s more comprehensive than the websites we have above.

Fake it till you make it

Fake it till you make it is another mock back end API that we can use to speed up our development.

It comes with both free and paid tiers, The paid tier have 1000 fake units a day with arrays up to 10 elements in size.

We can get one API token to use the free version.

The nesting depth is up to 1 level deep for the free version. The paid version lets us nest our JSON deeper.

Requests parameters are accepted in the paid version. And paid versions can have custom fields.

Support is also available for the paid versions via email.

Beeceptor

Beeceptor is another web app that lets us mock out a REST API. we can enter a name for our endpoint which is hosted in their subdomain.

It supports all kinds of requests like GET, POST, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE.

We can also simulate API responses and failures.

Payloads can be inspected for debugging purposes. Also, we can capture HTTP requests in real tine.

Other things it can do include A/B testing and simulate latencies and timeouts. These are all important things since we want to handle error cases in addition to successful cases.

Fake Rest

Fake Rest API is another fake API site. We can use them to mock out endpoints with data included.

Things like address, array, e-commerce data, and much more can all be retrieved right from this app.

We can also add our own data and use them whenever we like. We can specify any description for our endpoints including method name, verb, redirect, Content-Type , response code, and more.

ngduc/api-now

api-now is a Node package that we can run locally on our computer to create a fake API instantly.

It comes with default datasets. Also, it can take .json or .js file for data.

It has some routes like file upload, login, todos, images and more. The login route provides us with a JSON web token for authentication.

Also, it can serve files in a static directory. We just have to run npx api-now to run this package.

Mocky

Mocky is a simple app where we can enter the response we want to generate ourselves and get an endpoint for it on the fly.

We can use it to simulate responses with different status codes, body, and headers.

Conclusion

There’re many fake API apps that we can use to mock out our API for prototypes.

Some include data and some are more configurable. So we can take our pick and choose one that’s right for us.