Categories
React Tips

React Tips — Redirect, Error Handling and Redux, and .env Files

Spread the love

React is a popular library for creating web apps and mobile apps.

In this article, we’ll look at some tips for writing better React apps.

React Button Redirect Page on Click

We can redirect to a page when we click on an element by getting the history object.

For instance, we can write:

import React from 'react';
import { useHistory } from "react-router-dom";
function LoginPage () {
  const history = useHistory();
  const onClick = () => {
    history.push('new-page');
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <button
        onClick={onClick}
      >
        Login
      </button>
    </div>
  );
}
export default LoginPage;

We get the native history object with useHistory

Then we define the onClick function to call history.push to navigate to a new page.

If we’re using class components, we can write:

import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom';

class LoginPage extends Component {
  constuctor() {
    this.routeChange = this.routeChange.bind(this);
  }

  onClick() {
    this.props.history.push('forgot-password');
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <button onClick={onClick}>Forgot password?</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

export default withRouter(LoginPage);

We have the LoginPage class component.

To make the history prop available to the component, we pass it to withRouter .

We have the onClick method that calls the this.props.history.push method to navigate to the new page.

The routerChange method has to be bound to the component with bind so that we set the component class as the value of this .

Render Boolean Value in JSX

We can render boolean value in JSX by converting it to a string first.

For instance, we can write:

Boolean Value: {bool.toString()}

or:

Boolean Value: {String(bool)}

or:

Boolean Value: {'' + bool}

or:

{`Boolean Value: ${bool}`}

or:

Boolean Value: {JSON.stringify(bool)}

There are many ways to convert a boolean value into a string.

They’re all good except for the concatenation, which may be confusing.

Using event.target with React Components

We can use event.target to get a DOM element’s properties.

We can use the dataset property to get attributes prefixed with the data- prefix.

They’re considered custom attributes that let us pass data around with an element.

For instance, if we have a button, then we can write:

<button
  data-foo="home"
  data-bar="home"
  onClick={this.props.onClick}
/>
  Button
</button>

Then we can write:

onClick(e) {
   console.log(e.target.dataset.bar, e.target.dataset.foo);
}

to get the foo and bar properties from the button that we clicked with the dataset property.

dataset.foo has the value of the data-foo attribute.

dataset.bar has the value of the data-bar attribute.

Adding a .env File to React Project

If we have a create-react-app project, we can add an .env file to add the environment variables.

Inside the file, any keys that are prefixed with the REACT_APP_ prefix are read into the app.

So in our .env file, we can write:

REACT_APP_API_KEY=secret

We can then use the environment variable values by writing:

fetchData() {
  fetch(`https://example.com?api-key=${process.env.REACT_APP_API_KEY}`)
    .then((res) => res.json())
    .then((data) => console.log(data))
}

We read the environment variable value with the process.env object.

How to Pass Multiple Parameters to Input’s onChange Handler

We can pass in multiple parameters to an input’s onChange handler.

To do that, we can write:

<Input
  type="text"
  value={this.state.name}
  onChange={this.onChange.bind(this, this.state.user.id)}
/>

Then we can define our onChange method by writing:

onChange(`userId`, event) {
  const newName = event.target.value;
},

We have whatever we pass in as the first argument.

And the last argument is the object.

How to Catch and Handle Error Response 422 with Redux and Axios

We can call dispatch to dispatch the action within a React component.

For instance, we can write:

axios({
  method: 'post',
  responseType: 'json',
  url: `${SERVER_URL}/login`,
  data: {
    username,
    password
  }
})
 .then(response => {
   dispatch(setUser(response));
 })
 .catch(error => {
   dispatch({ type: AUTH_FAILED });
   dispatch({ type: ERROR, payload: error.data.error.message });
 });

We make a POST request with Axios.

Then in the then callback, we get the response and call dispatch and our setUser action creator.

And then we call the catch method with a callback to handle errors.

We call dispatch with or without a payload.

Calling dispatch would update the store with the new state value.

Conclusion

We can redirect pages on click.

And we can handle errors with Redux by calling dispatch to update the stores.

Booleans can be rendered if we convert them to a string.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *